Millennials

Millennials, by and large, have received a bad rap in the work environment. You’ve heard the criticism.  They don’t work hard enough; they need constant coddling; they have the attention span of a gnat; they’re not loyal to their employers; and they’re just not willing to be patient and work their way up the proverbial ladder.

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One of the first comprehensive studies to broadly examine student and public opinions about online learning was welcomed by educational leaders, including Rodney A. Erickson, president of Penn State University, whose World Campus is one of the largest online efforts in higher education:

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In counseling a new CEO recently on the importance of the First 100 days, we encountered a familiar challenge.

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The CEO’s organization, while successful, needs change. Old attitudes and outmoded ways of doing things have become encrusted, and the first hundred days represent a unique opportunity to break those molds at a time when change is almost universally expected and the organization is likely to be most receptive to it.

At the same time, skeptics within the organization are likely to doubt the new CEO’s fidelity to the organization’s core principles. They will almost certainly (though incorrectly) view the change as undermining those principles – and, though they surely won’t admit it, threatening to themselves and to their careers. These skeptics are especially likely to be clustered in a part of the organization most closely associated with carrying out the organization’s mission, and physically separated from the corporate headquarters.

This isn’t unusual. Consider, for example, the skepticism with which journalists at the Wall Street Journal greeted Rupert Murdoch’s takeover, or the people at IBM first reacted to the first CEO to come from outside the company. And, to be fair, the skepticism isn’t always unjustified.

In situations like this, one of the most powerful tools in the new CEO’s arsenal is symbolism. All CEO’s have a mandate for change – some more than others, to be sure, but studies show significant change, especially in strategy and in the leadership team is almost universally expected.

But some change is especially symbolic, and either by design or by accident will send a powerful and lasting message. It’s vitally important that the new CEO seize opportunities to send these symbolic messages, and avoid sending the wrong ones inadvertently. And don’t confuse “symbolic” with “superficial.” It is the substance of these key actions that makes them symbolic.

 

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We've had a number of posts on our blog speak to the importance of social media monitoring in strategy creation, including a recent addition that highlights the need for improvements to technological platforms to better inform those strategies. Now, it appears as if some of those much-needed improvements are making their way into the world of social media monitoring tools, and via the wine industry no less.

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Mashable writes about the rising success of Cruvee, a social media monitoring platform that specializes in identifying, decoding, and understanding online interactions in the wine industry. Currently, about 27% of all wineries in the US are using the service to inform them of their brand's conversations online, among other cool features the program has incorporated into their service such as monetizing Facebook pages by giving the user the ability to turn their page into a virtual storefront, complete with a "buy now" button.

But the most interesting aspect of Cruvee's service is that it addresses a number of issues currently facing users of other social media monitoring platforms. Cruvee has built-in solutions that aim to minimize the "clutter" associated with finding where your brand lives in online conversations. Think of it as a platform that allows your brand to focus on the strategy that results from conversation analysis, rather than the time-consuming process of receiving those results. Here are a few of the things the Cruvee model offers that should be incorporated into other platforms:

1. Comprehension of industry "jargon". By focusing on one industry, the platform has built-in identifiers for language that other platforms often do not pick up. For example, someone tweeting the about the great "cab sauv" they enjoyed is picked up by the platform and shows up in the conversation dashboard results, where in many instances they may not. By searching for language that influencers within industry actually use (including shorthand, as in the above reference), the result is a clearer picture of what is actually being said.

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PulsePoint Group
March 14, 2011

A recap of last week's POV posts:

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Time Inc. CEO Jack Griffin was recently ousted after less than six months on the job. An agent of change within the organization, his approach to overhauling the ailing media organization clearly didn't mesh with what his organization was ready for. Griffin's demise reminds me of the stellar job Louis Gerstner did when faced with a struggling IBM in the early 1990's. One of the greatest examples of a change agent succeeding, Gerstner was responsible for changing the entire direction of an organization that until he took over was looking to break up its business into smaller units and dissolve others. Today, IBM is a singular technology services powerhouse thanks to Gerstner's strategic vision and ability to guide the company through a massive change in culture.

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PulsePoint Group
February 24, 2011

A recap of the previous week’s POV posts:

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PulsePoint Group
February 4, 2011

Much of the recent discussion surrounding innovation in the enterprise has been geared towards consumer-facing aspects of the business: crowdsourcing new product ideas, engaging the consumer in experiential marketing, or even asking the consumer to develop advertising or mobile applications for the business.

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Charlie Perkins, public relations director of the Americas for Ernst & Young, on the current communications landscape and how we impact our organizations.

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George Jamison, principal at Spencer Stuart, on today's communications landscape and job prospects for Chief Communications Officers.

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