PulsePoint Group
February 25, 2011

There has been a lot of debate on the pros and cons of "empowering" employees in the enterprise by allowing them access to social media and collaborative tools in the workplace. What can the enterprise gain from allowing full access for all its employees? What are the inherent risks involved and how can they be minimized? How much is enough? These types of questions are what most organizations we work with are struggling with as they come to realize they must embrace the digital revolution.

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PulsePoint Group
February 24, 2011

A recap of the previous week’s POV posts:

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PulsePoint Group
February 9, 2011

As a strategic consulting firm, counsel is only as good as it is palatable to our clients. Some might interpret that as requiring that we supply strategic insight that adds value to our clients. While that is at the core of what we do, it isn't what I am referring to.

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PulsePoint Group
February 4, 2011

Much of the recent discussion surrounding innovation in the enterprise has been geared towards consumer-facing aspects of the business: crowdsourcing new product ideas, engaging the consumer in experiential marketing, or even asking the consumer to develop advertising or mobile applications for the business.

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PulsePoint Group
February 2, 2011

A recap of the previos week's POV posts:

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Originally Published PR Week, January 28, 2011 (subscription access only)

Research among CEOs and line-of-business executives reveals that the single-most common criticism of communications professionals is that below the CCO level the function is primarily occupied by tacticians.

A common result: when divisional or business unit leadership meet to discuss strategy, the PR person -- perhaps other than the CCO -- is often left out.

Are most PR pros really not capable of engaging at that level?

Unlikely, but here are a few thoughts.

First, every CCO needs to be honest with his or her evaluation of talent.  The most critical time is when hiring is done. If we're candid, we often do hire tacticians. After all, we need to get things done.

We also tend to hire from a common pool, that is, people from within our profession.

The consequence often means a talent pool that doesn't have the same academic qualifications and /or serious business experience as other staff functions.

Bottom line: Hire smart. Raise the bar. And, as the business we're in gets increasingly sophisticated, there are plenty of high-ranking B-school grads, for example, who would welcome a career in our profession.

Second, and this is a tricky one, it just may be difficult to be both a tactician and a strategist at the same time.

Let's be clear: We need to do a lot more than provide counsel. We need to get stuff done. The greater the demands and the higher volume of output, the more communications staffers get buried in the day-to-day.  That may be reality.

But getting stuff done is a given. Flawless execution is a table-stake. No one earns a reputation for just doing what's expected of them.

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